and…celebration!

The very fact that you are alive and breathing, is a cause to celebrate, isn’t it?

The mesmerising moments captured at Pandharpur Wari, the annual pilgrimage to the town of Padharpur, which is the seat of Lord Vithoba in the Indian state of Maharashtra, in honour of the deity. Palakhis (palanquin processions) carrying the paduka (foot prints) of the deity and various saints, most notably Dnyaneshwar and Tukaram from the Varkari sect, are taken from their respective shrines to Pandharpur. Varkari or Warkari is a Marathi term which means “one who performs the Wari” or “one who venerates the Vithoba”. The tradition is more than 700 to 800 years old.

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Belief is a strong emotion in itself. It can move mountains. Believe in yourself, and celebrate life. The world will begin to look like a much brighter place.

Visit https://www.rohitghai.com/and-celebration/

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India’s claim to lunar history

Chandrayaan-2, India’s most ambitious second lunar mission to be launched on July 15, will be the first of its kind as it will shed light on a completely unexplored section of the Moon – its South Polar region.

Leveraging nearly a decade of scientific research and engineering development, the mission is aimed at helping in better understanding of the origin and evolution of the Moon by conducting detailed topographical studies, comprehensive mineralogical analyses, and a host of other experiments on the lunar surface.

Read more at https://www.rohitghai.com/chandrayaan-2/ 

Mouthwatering Malaysia

jalan-alor

Until the 15th century, the cornerstone of Malay flavour was a paste made with mainly roots —— lemon grass, small red shallots, garlic, fresh turmeric and galangal.  Spices and chillies were added later when the spice trade began. —— There is a main street food area called Jalan Alor.  Here the entire neighbourhood is dotted with stalls, selling everything from fish head curry to sambal and satay.  Malays can easily tuck into up to six meals a day.

Beef Rendang


Normally, the day starts with breakfast, then a mid-morning snack, followed by lunch.  A light bowl of noodles fills any gaps between 4pm and 5pm, and dinner is the main meal of the day.  To cater to this non-stop nosh, the hawker culture works around the clock to feed the hungry with platefuls of delicacies like satay, laksa, redang and roti jala.

Malaysian cuisine


Rendang made with tempeh (soya bean cake) is quite delicious.  Curries, mainly made with coconut milk, have their roots in Indian cuisine.  Malay culture is a smorgasbord of modern Indian, Thai, Arab and Chinese influences and has been strongly influenced by people of neighbouring lands, including the  Siamese, Javanese, Sumatran and Indians.  The influence of Hinduism was significant and the Malay were primarily Hindus before converting to Islam in the 15th century,  For 2,000 years, the traffic of traders between the Malayan Archipelago and India resulted in frequent inter-marriages, especially from Tamil Nadu and Gujarat.

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A wave of Indian and Chinese immigration occurred again 200 years ago when the country needed labour.  A Malaysian meal is influenced by all these communities and usually consists of a curry, fried, grilled or steamed fish in a banana leaf, sambal, ulam and a dessert made with coconut, jiggery and rice powder.
laksa5For a bird’s eye view of Malaysian food it’s best to go from one ethnic plate to another.  For a travelling foodie, Ramadan is the best time to experience Indian Muslim style food  ——– a culinary assimilation of Indian and Malay cooking styles at Mamak stalls. ” Malay-Muslim” dishes are basically a range of curries, the most prominent one being the Malaysian chicken curry.  Every street stall has a secret recipe for curry.  While the curries have a distinct Indian element, they are prepared using a varied spice mix called “rempah” ——- a complex paste of spices and aromatics roasted and cooked together forming the base even as coconut milk adds body.
Another coconut infused dish is the noodle soup called Laksa.  This is a Nonya dish (Nonyas are a community of Malay and Chinese descent where Malay men mostly took Chinese wives)  Their cuisine is popularly known as “Straits Chinese” and is represented by popular dishes such as Char Kuey Teow (stir-fried noodles with bean sprouts, prawns, eggs — duck or chicken, chives and thin slices of preserved Chinese sausages and the ubiquitous Hainanese chicken rice of poached chicken in a bland but fragrant broth.  Of course, trust the Malays to re-jig the recipe, so go easy on the dipping sauce laced with chillies, garlic and ginger, which gives it a spicy kick that will make your tongue twist and taste buds salivate.
——— Fareeda Kanga

Desi inventor of e-mail

V.A.Shiva.2012
 
Shiva Ayyadurai, an Indian-American invented Email in 1978, when he was just 14.  He created a computer programme, which he called “Email”, that replicated all the functions of the inter-office mail system : inbox, outbox, folders, memo, attachments, address book, etc.  These features are a familiar part of any email system.
 
On August 30, 1982, the US Government officially recognized Ayyadurai, as the inventor of email, by awarding him the 1st US Copyright for Email, for his 1978 invention.  At 14, he attended a special summer programme at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences of New York University (NYU), and later went on to graduate from Livingston High School, in New Jersey.
 
While attending high school, he also worked at the University of Medicine & Dentistry, as a Research Fellow.  Dr. Leslie Michelson, then Director of the LCN at UMDNJ, gave him a challenge to convert the old system of paper-based mail communications, used at UMDNJ, to an electronic one. 
 
He conceived an electronic version of the system and created a computer program, of over 50,000 lines of code, which electronically replicated all the features of the inter-office mail system.